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Maria Salacuse

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  • published Judge Harris Fireside Chat in Upcoming Events 2024-05-16 10:39:59 -0400

    Judge Harris Fireside Chat

    Our latest fireside chat brings an appellate perspective! Please join us on Wednesday, May 29, 2024, at 12 p.m for a fireside chat with United States Circuit Judge Pamela Harris, one of Maryland's three judges on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Come learn about her path to the bench and tips for federal appeals.

    WHEN
    May 29, 2024 at 12:00pm
    rsvp

  • published 2023-2024 News in News 2024-03-29 18:15:09 -0400

    2023-2024 News

    Record Attendance at FBA Maryland Chapter Annual Luncheon

    On Friday, April 12, 2024 the Maryland Chapter welcomed approximately 300 members of the Bar and Bench of the District of Maryland to the Chapter’s Annual Luncheon at the Baltimore Hyatt Hotel. During the pre-lunch reception, members mingled with colleagues and met new connections.  As for the Luncheon, Mark S. Saudek warmly welcomed members and introduced all presenters and honorees.  FBA Maryland Chapter President Ezra Gollogly provided opening and closing remarks.  Honorees included the Honorable Adam B. Abelson, the Honorable Erin Aslan, the Honorable Charles D. Austin, the Honorable Brendan A. Hurson, and the Honorable Matthew J. Maddox.  The Chapter also recognized the Honorable J. Frederick Motz.  On behalf of the Chapter, Stuart Berman presented the Peter A. DiRito Award to the Honorable Deborah K. Chasanow, the Honorable Roger Titus, the Honorable Peter J. Messitte, and the Honorable Alexander Williams for their service to the District on the occasion of the 30th Anniversary of the Greenbelt Courthouse.  Established in 1987, the Peter A. DiRito Award recognizes public service that furthers the FBA’s goals of enhancing the federal legal profession, advancement of justice, and the betterment of society.

    The Chapter thanks the presenters and honorees for their participation, as well as the FBA Maryland Chapter Luncheon Committee of Mark S. Saudek, Maria Salacuse, and Samantha Miller. For more photos of the event, click here.

    Fireside Chat Held with Chief Judge James K. Bredar on April 25, 2024

    On April 25, 2024, the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association continued its fireside chat series with a conversation with Chief Judge James K. Bredar, whose tenure as chief judge will conclude at the end of May.  Chief Judge Bredar described his early professional experience in the National Park Service and his unique profile as an attorney who worked both as a prosecutor and as a public defender before being appointed first as a United States Magistrate Judge (1998) and later as a United States District Judge (2010).

    Chief Judge Bredar shared valuable insights with the guests who attended the chat, including about the need for lawyers to form and nurture professional mentorships early in their careers; the role of law clerks in chambers; and the important work of the Judicial Conference of the United States.  Chief Judge Bredar concluded with some thoughts about the rule of law as a bulwark against anti-democratic pressures in contemporary society.

    We are truly grateful for Chief Judge Bredar’s willingness to spend an hour with us and to share his views and experience after a long and rich career in public service.

    Fireside Chat Held with Magistrate Judge Erin Aslan on March 27, 2024

    On March 27, 2024, the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association hosted Magistrate Judge Erin Aslan for its Fireside Chat series. Judge Aslan joined the court in December 2023 after working most recently in the Office of the Inspector General. She reflected on her path to the bench, including her experiences studying abroad in Latin America, her law school clinic work representing victims of domestic violence, and her clerkship in the Southern District of New York. Judge Aslan also spoke about how her work investigating allegations of police misconduct with the Civilian Complaint Review Board in New York City inspired her to go to law school and enhanced her commitment to public service. She provided insightful advice to both new attorneys and established practitioners regarding mentorship, career development, and being a working parent. She also shared some practical guidance for litigators. We are grateful to Judge Aslan for the enlightening chat with the Chapter.

    Finding Justice: History of Women Lawyers in Maryland

    In celebration of Women's History Month, on March 12, 2024, the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association and the Women's Law Center cosponsored an engaging webinar with the Honorable Lynne A. Battaglia who discussed her seminal work: "Finding Justice: A History of Women Lawyers in Maryland since 1642." Judge Battaglia traced the history of women lawyers in Maryland, beginning with those women during the colonial period who appeared as attorney-in-fact, such as Margaret Brent.  Judge Battaglia discussed how married women faced more obstacles than those who were single since in many states such as Maryland a married woman could not individually own or inherit property, enter into contracts, or keep money earned unless her husband permitted it. The Married Women's Property Acts of 1898 significantly improved the legal status of married women and allowing even greater change in the legal community.  Judge Battaglia highlighted many of the "firsts" such as Etta Maddox who was the first woman admitted to the Baltimore Law School in 1900 and became the first licensed woman in the State of Maryland.  She also discussed her own experiences being the first presidentially appointed woman to serve as the U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland and becoming the third woman to be appointed to the Maryland Court of Appeals. Judge Battaglia emphasized the importance of mentors, both male and female, to women lawyers to ensure diversity and accessibility in the legal profession.

        

    Annual Introduction to Federal Practice Program Held

    The Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association presented its annual Introduction to Federal Practice Program on Friday, March 1, 2024 in the J. Frederick Motz Ceremonial Courtroom at the federal courthouse in Baltimore. This year’s edition marked the second return to an in-person format and the first in-person version in Baltimore since 2019. The Chapter’s Immediate Past President served as master of ceremonies. After wonderful welcoming remarks from Chief Judge James K. Bredar, the audience was treated to”

    • A primer on the courthouses by Chief Deputy Clerk David Ciambruschini
    • Highlights of the District’s Local Rules and Standing Orders  from Lauren McLarney, Neel Lalchandani and the Hon. Julie R. Rubin
    • A discussion of discovery and ESI issues featuring Tom Barnard and the Hon. J. Mark Coulson
    • Catherine Curran O’Malley, Executive Director of the Women’s Law Center of Maryland speaking on services to victims of domestic violence
    • A review of motions practice with Kristen Eriksoon and the Hon. Deborah Boardman
    • A discussion of effective mediation practices with Bradley M. Strickland and the Hon. Gina L. Simms

    And finally a brief word from Chapter President Ezra Gollogly about the benefits of FBA membership.

    The formal program concluded with 30 members of the audience being sworn in as members of the District’s bar during an admission ceremony presided over by the Hon. Brendan A. Hurson. Following the program participants, new admittees, their guests and presenters adjourned to a catered reception in the Courthouse lobby.

        

        

    FBA Maryland Chapter Submits Reader Commentary to The Sun on Keeping the Judiciary Safe

    Joining with the Maryland State Bar Association, on December 21, 2023, the FBA Maryland Chapter submitted a reader commentary to The Baltimore Sun regarding its editorial “Keeping Maryland judges safe shouldn’t require lessening transparency.”  In the commentary, we asserted that The Sun failed to balance its transparency-related comments with the multitude of threats faced by Maryland's state and federal judiciary, noting that Judge Wilkinson's death is part of an escalating level of violence towards judicial officers that needs to be immediately addressed.  We explained that the proposed Maryland legislation from 2023 (SB 221) appropriately balances the need for safety of judges and their families with the need for judicial transparency. We likewise explained that the State of Maryland has safeguards in place to monitor and regulate, including the Judicial Ethics Committee and the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities.  To read the full commentary, please visit Judges must be kept safe (baltimoresun.com).

    FBA Maryland Chapter is Accepting Entries for its Annual Short Essay Contest for Maryland High School Students

    The Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association is now accepting entries for its annual short essay contest for high school students.  This year’s essay topic is: “Identify someone who promotes and cultivates diversity, equity, and inclusion in your community or school, and explain how that person has impacted or inspired you.” The contest is open to high school students enrolled in public, private, parochial and charter schools and home-schooled students of equivalent grade status (grades 9-12) in Maryland. Essays must be submitted online at [email protected]. Entries will be accepted through 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on March 28, 2024.  A judging committee comprised of federal judges and FBA board members will decide on the top three essays submitted.  Each student is limited to one (1) essay submission.  Essays will be evaluated based on the following criterion: originality (30%); language arts skills (30%); faithfulness to the theme (30%); and clarity (10%). The first-place winner will have their essay published on the FBA MD website and in the FBA MD newsletter.  Cash prizes will also be awarded as follows: First place: $1,000; Second place: $500; Third place: $250.  For the official rules, please see FBA MD Short Essay Contest.

    Fireside Chat Held with Magistrate Judge Adam B. Abelson on January 24, 2024

    The FBA Maryland Chapter kicked off 2024 with a continuation of our fireside chat series. Magistrate Judge Adam B. Abelson, who joined the court in Fall 2023, discussed his upbringing, his career prior to becoming a judge, and his various responsibilities as a magistrate judge. Judge Abelson spoke about how his grandmother, a first-generation American, instilled in him the importance of public service. Judge Abelson shared that he was inspired to go to law school after working alongside human rights lawyers in Chile. After law school and two federal clerkships, Judge Abelson joined Zuckerman Spaeder LLP, where he developed a varied and fulfilling practice.

    Judge Abelson discussed the transition from advocate to judge and how he conceptualizes his new role. He praised the collegiality of the court and shared how his colleagues’ “open door” policy has been invaluable as he continues to learn and grow. Judge Abelson broke down the “nuts and bolts” of serving as a magistrate judge, from mediating settlement conferences to resolving discovery disputes, and provided practice tips for litigants. We thank Judge Abelson for the illuminating and enjoyable chat.

    Fireside Chat Held with Magistrate Judge Charles Austin on February 23, 2024

    In the most recent Fireside Chat Series, the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association hosted Magistrate Judge Charles Austin.  Judge Austin, a Maryland native, shared his connections to Baltimore.  His love of sports inspired him to pursue broadcast news and later led him to a career in journalism.  Judge Austin spoke of his time working in television as a director and producer and the skills he gained in those roles.  

    Judge Austin reflected on his time in private practice and government service, including the importance of fulfilling his various roles with integrity and excellence.  He shared his commitment to public service, the law, and his belief in the importance of treating all litigants with dignity and fairness.  Judge Austin also shared advice for newer attorneys and practitioners.  We're grateful to Judge Austin for sharing his time and thoughts with the Chapter.


  • published 2023-2024 Spotlights in Spotlights 2024-03-09 15:25:52 -0500

    2023 - 2024 Spotlights

    FBA Maryland Chapter Celebrates Black History Month Spotlighting Thurgood Marshall

    Profile Summary by Samantha Miller

    Perhaps the most famous Black legal hero in American history is Thurgood Marshall, and rightfully so. In spite of deeply entrenched racism, Marshall reached the pinnacle of the legal profession, becoming the first Black United States Solicitor General and—of course—the first Black Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    While Marshall is a national figure, he occupies a special (and complicated) place in Baltimore history. He was born in Baltimore on July 2, 1908, where he spent the majority of his childhood. He attended Lincoln University, our nation’s first HBCU, where he excelled academically and was a decorated competitive debater. After college, Marshall decided to pursue a career in law. His hometown law school at the University of Maryland, however, was all-white, and Marshall was ineligible to attend because of the color of his skin. Undeterred, Marshall matriculated at the Howard University of Law and went on to graduate first in his class.

    Marshall devoted his career to dismantling racist structures that permeated American life and was a leader in the Civil Right Movement. Early in his career, he represented Black law school applicant who, like him, was turned away from the University of Maryland. Marshall won the case, convincing Maryland’s highest court that the University of Maryland’s segregationist policy was unconstitutional. This early victory would foreshadow one of Marshall’s greatest triumphs, which came roughly twenty years later.

    Marshall joined the NAACP in 1936 and, in 1940, founded the organization’s storied Legal Defense Fund. For over twenty years, Marshall and the NAACP challenged state-sponsored segregation in courts all over the country. His representations sometimes put him in personal danger. During one case in Florida, where Marshall represented four Black men wrongfully accused of raping a white woman, Marshall received death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. Marshall, however, refused to be intimidated in his pursuit of justice.

    Marshall’s work with the NAACP sometimes brought him before the United States Supreme Court. Of the 32 cases he argued before the Court, he won 29 of them. Marshall’s most celebrated victory was in the seminal case Brown vs. Board of Education, the case through which the Supreme Court declared segregation in public schools to be unconstitutional.

    In 1961, Marshall became a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Several years later, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Marshall as the U.S. Solicitor General, the first Black person to occupy the role. Marshall was, of course, not finished with “firsts”: in 1967, Marshall because the first Black Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    Marshall spent more than two decades on the Supreme Court. He was a consistent vote on liberal issues and, as the Court became more conservative, frequently wrote in dissent. Marshall died in 1993 at the age of 84, but his legacy lives on—as does his name. Baltimore’s airport is named for the pathbreaking jurist, as is the law library of the school that turned him away due to his race. The University of Maryland recently named another building after Marshall. As the school continues to celebrate this hero, it also acknowledges its complicity in the racist status quo that made Marshall’s ascent so improbable and awe-inspiring. Because of Thurgood Marshall, the law—and the country—has been forever changed for the better.

    Spotlight on Lena King Lee: Educator, Attorney and Champion for Women and Children

    Profile Summary by Evelyn Cusson

    Lena King Lee was born on July 14, 1906 in Sumter, Alabama.  Her family moved to Illinois and then to Pennsylvania where her father found work as a coal miner and became an activist for worker’s rights. Lee’s father earned enough to send Lee and her siblings to private boarding school.  Lee graduated third in her class in which she was the only African American student.  She went on to earn a scholarship at Cheyney Training School, now Cheyney University near Philadelphia, and received a teaching certificate there in 1927.  Lee moved to Maryland to teach, first to Annapolis, and then to Baltimore.  She taught sixth grade and married Baltimore businessman Robert R. Lee in 1937, and two years later, received a bachelor’s degree in education from Morgan State College.  Like other African Americans, Lee was not permitted to enroll in graduate studies at the University of Maryland College Park, which remained segregated until 1951.  Undeterred, she earned a master’s degree from New York University in 1947, travelling to and from New York City every weekend. 

    In 1947, Lee became the principal at the Henry H. Garnet Elementary School, where Thurgood Marshall had attended elementary school from 1914 to 1920.  That Fall, Lee decided to enter law school at the University of Maryland School of Law because she was frustrated by what she saw as the Baltimore City School Board’s long delay in promoting her to principal.  She continued to work during law school and had the strong support of her husband.  Lee graduated in 1951 and was admitted to the Maryland and Baltimore bars.  Lee was the first black woman to be admitted to the Bar Association of Baltimore City.  After obtaining her law degree, Lee continued her career as an educator, joining the American Federation of Teachers as its first black member and working in the Baltimore City School System.

    Lee entered the civic arena in 1955 when Mayor Thomas D’Alesandro appointed her to the Baltimore Redevelopment Commission and then to the Baltimore Urban Renewal and Housing Agency.  Thereafter, Governor J. Millard Tawes appointed Lee to the new Maryland Advisory Council on Higher Education, which proposed a new governing structure for the University of Maryland and former state teachers colleges.  Lee retired from the Baltimore City Public School System in 1964 and began practicing law full-time with Nicholas & Gosnell.  She supported Joseph Tydings’s successful campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1964 and two years later, won the Democratic primary for a seat in the Maryland House of Delegates.  Lee found political support among teachers and women.  During her legislative career, Lee made the interests of women and children her focus, supporting mandatory kindergartens, day care for low-income mothers, educational television, tougher penalties for child abuse, and improving schools.  She founded the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus. 

    After retiring from the legislature due to health concerns, Lee continued a full-time law practice in the areas of family, contract, and criminal law.  Lee, like other African American women, had to fight the double barriers of race and gender to gain a foothold in the legal profession.  Lee used her background in education and her legal training as tools to fight discrimination and advocate for causes meaningful to women that we are continuing to grapple with today. 

    *This profile is adapted from “African American Women Admitted to the Bar in Maryland, 1946-1974: Four Profiles of Public Calling,” at pp. 119-121, by Dean Phoebe A. Haddon in Finding Justice: A History of Women Lawyers in Maryland since 1642.

    Our Second Black History Spotlight: Edward Garrison Draper

    Profile Summary by Gina M. Smith, Esq.

    Edward Garrison Draper was born free in 1834 in Baltimore, Maryland at a time when slavery was in full effect as the driving economic engine of the United States (U.S.).  Edward’s parents, Garrison and Charlotte Draper were the 1.5% of U.S. population living as free blacks. Although his education was limited, Garrison Draper ran a successful tobacco and cigar making business.

    Determined that Edward would obtain a better education than himself, Garrison sent Edward to Philadelphia where the public school system was superior. Around this time, Garrison Draper became heavily involved in the Maryland Colonization Society. This Society was one of several active organizations which advanced the belief that blacks would never receive equality in the U.S. As a result, the Society advocated free blacks immigrate from the U.S. to an African colony now known as Liberia to establish a free community where they could live, work and prosper in a place where their humanity, dignity and worth would not be denied.

    Following completion of public school, Edward entered Dartmouth College. Edward matriculated from Dartmouth with high marks and the determination to become a lawyer.  Once trained as a lawyer, Edward’s vision was to practice his profession not in the State in which he was born. This is because in Maryland in 1857 and for most of the 19th century becoming a lawyer required the applicant be white; a Maryland resident; 21 years or older; and having read the law. Therefore, likely influenced by his father, Edward would obtain the training he needed and then set up his practice in the freehold community now known as the country Liberia.

    Until the late 19th century, law schools were uncommon in the U.S. Thus, most people completed the reading the law” requirement through independent study or apprenticeship, often under the supervision of an experienced attorney. Edward spent two years reading the law under the supervision of Baltimore attorney Charles Gillman.  Following his time with Attorney Gillman, Edward continued to learn his profession under the tutelage of prominent Harvard-educated attorney, Charles W. Storey. Attorney Storey would show Edward courtroom action.

    In 1857, having completed his legal studies, Edward presented himself to the Honorable Zacheus Collins Lee. Judge Lee, a slave owner himself and first cousin of Confederate General, Robert E. Lee, was tasked with testing Edward’s legal knowledge and review of his qualifications. Upon completion Judge Lee wrote:

    I have found him intelligent and well-informed in his answers to the questions propounded by me, and qualified in all respects to be admitted to the Bar in Maryland, if he was a free white citizen of this state.

    Aware that Edward had no plans on testing the structural racism in place to integrate the Maryland Bar, Judge Lee provided young Edward with a certificate attesting to his legal qualifications.  True to his word, six days later Edward sailed to Liberia to begin a practice denied to him in his state of birth. Sadly, Edward died a year later from tuberculosis.

    Maryland would continue to prevent non-whites from being admitted to the Bar until 1885 when Everett J. Waring a graduate of Howard Law became Maryland’s first admitted black lawyer. Thousands of black candidates, myself included, have followed Everett J. Waring by obtaining admission to Maryland’s Bar.

    Edward Garrison Draper’s story may have never been known but for historian buffs Hon. John Browning (ret.), Hon. Carolyn Wright-Sanders (ret.) and others who have uncovered the stories of individuals buried in the history books denied entrance into the legal profession on the account of race. Their push for restorative justice for these individuals includes posthumous admission. And so, 166 years after his denial, on October 26, 2023, the Supreme Court of Maryland in a symbolic ceremony attended by Maryland’s first black Governor, Wes Moore, first black Attorney General Anthony Brown, and first black Chief Justice, Robert M. Bell, posthumously admitted Edward Waren Draper to Maryland’s Bar. Speaking at the ceremony Justice Angela M. Eaves said, “there is no expiration to do the right thing, even when more than a century and a half has gone by.” 

    Justice Eaves words and the Court’s symbolic admission of a man long ago wrongly denied the right to practice this profession because of race encapsulate one of Dr. Martin Luther King’s most famous quotes “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”  Edward Draper Garrison’s arc is complete. He is now a member of the Maryland Bar.

     

     


  • published Thurgood Marshall 2024-02-03 17:25:49 -0500

    Thurgood Marshall

    Profile Summary by Samantha Miller

    Perhaps the most famous Black legal hero in American history is Thurgood Marshall, and rightfully so. In spite of deeply entrenched racism, Marshall reached the pinnacle of the legal profession, becoming the first Black United States Solicitor General and—of course—the first Black Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    While Marshall is a national figure, he occupies a special (and complicated) place in Baltimore history. He was born in Baltimore on July 2, 1908, where he spent the majority of his childhood. He attended Lincoln University, our nation’s first HBCU, where he excelled academically and was a decorated competitive debater. After college, Marshall decided to pursue a career in law. His hometown law school at the University of Maryland, however, was all-white, and Marshall was ineligible to attend because of the color of his skin. Undeterred, Marshall matriculated at the Howard University of Law and went on to graduate first in his class.

    Marshall devoted his career to dismantling racist structures that permeated American life and was a leader in the Civil Right Movement. Early in his career, he represented Black law school applicant who, like him, was turned away from the University of Maryland. Marshall won the case, convincing Maryland’s highest court that the University of Maryland’s segregationist policy was unconstitutional. This early victory would foreshadow one of Marshall’s greatest triumphs, which came roughly twenty years later.

    Marshall joined the NAACP in 1936 and, in 1940, founded the organization’s storied Legal Defense Fund. For over twenty years, Marshall and the NAACP challenged state-sponsored segregation in courts all over the country. His representations sometimes put him in personal danger. During one case in Florida, where Marshall represented four Black men wrongfully accused of raping a white woman, Marshall received death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. Marshall, however, refused to be intimidated in his pursuit of justice.

    Marshall’s work with the NAACP sometimes brought him before the United States Supreme Court. Of the 32 cases he argued before the Court, he won 29 of them. Marshall’s most celebrated victory was in the seminal case Brown vs. Board of Education, the case through which the Supreme Court declared segregation in public schools to be unconstitutional.

    In 1961, Marshall became a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Several years later, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Marshall as the U.S. Solicitor General, the first Black person to occupy the role. Marshall was, of course, not finished with “firsts”: in 1967, Marshall because the first Black Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    Marshall spent more than two decades on the Supreme Court. He was a consistent vote on liberal issues and, as the Court became more conservative, frequently wrote in dissent. Marshall died in 1993 at the age of 84, but his legacy lives on—as does his name. Baltimore’s airport is named for the pathbreaking jurist, as is the law library of the school that turned him away due to his race. The University of Maryland recently named another building after Marshall. As the school continues to celebrate this hero, it also acknowledges its complicity in the racist status quo that made Marshall’s ascent so improbable and awe-inspiring. Because of Thurgood Marshall, the law—and the country—has been forever changed for the better.


  • published 2022-2023 Spotlights in Spotlights 2024-02-03 17:57:19 -0500

    2022-2023 Spotlights

    ANTHONY GREGORY BROWN

    Profile Summary by Gina Smith

    Anthony Gregory Brown has been a trailblazer breaking barriers for most of his life.

    Brown was born in 1961 in Huntington, New York, to immigrant parents. In his senior year, Brown became the first African American to be elected president of Huntington High School's student council. In 1984, Brown graduated from Harvard College with an A.B. cum laude, and as a Distinguished Military Graduate through MIT’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps.

    Upon graduation, Brown received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He served on active duty for five years. He graduated first in his flight class at Fort Rucker, Alabama, and received his aeronautical rating as an Army aviator. 

    After completing his active-duty service, Brown returned to graduate school, entering Harvard Law School in 1989 and earning his JD degree in 1992. Brown continued his military service transferring from the Army's Aviation Branch to the Judge Advocate General's Corps as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) in the United States Army Reserve. 

    In 1994, Brown joined the Washington, D.C. office of the international law firm of Wilmer Cutler Pickering (now WilmerHale). While putting his roots down in Maryland, Brown practiced law with the late John Payton a renowned civil rights attorney and former president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and Stephen H. Sachs, who was the United States Attorney for the District of Maryland from 1967 to 1970 and was the 40th Attorney General of Maryland. 

    Brown's political career began in 1998 when he was elected to serve in the Maryland House of Delegates, representing the 25th district in Prince George's County. In 2004, Brown, then a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, was deployed to Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Brown served in Baghdad, Fallujah, Kirkuk, and Basra with the 353rd Civil Affairs Command and he received the Bronze Star for his distinguished service in Iraq.

    In 2006, Brown was elected Lieutenant Governor on a ticket with Martin O'Malley, the former mayor of Baltimore. Brown served two terms as Lieutenant Governor.

    In 2014, Brown became the first African American at the top of the democratic ticket for Maryland governor. Although Larry Hogan would win that governor’s race, Brown returned to political office in 2016 earning a seat in the United States House of Representatives for Maryland’s Congressional District 4. During his time in Congress, Brown served on the Committee for Armed Services, Committee on Ethics, Committee on Natural Resources and Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure.

    In 2022, Brown successfully ran for Attorney General. On January 3, 2023, Brown was sworn into office becoming Maryland’s first African American Attorney General.

    In his current role, Brown will continue to be a leading voice on equity and justice matters building on his past accomplishments which include: fighting to repeal the death penalty in Maryland; decriminalizing marijuana and expanding record expungement; adopting stringent background checks and training requirements for gun sales; banning assault rifles and large capacity magazines; expanding protections for victims of domestic violence and abused and neglected children, and veterans with mental and behavioral health needs; and ensuring transparency and fairness in our policing and criminal justice systems. 

    In addition to being a veteran and dedicated public servant, Brown is a husband to Karmen Walker and father of three young adults.

     

    NATASHA DARTIGUE

     

    Profile Summary by Francisco Carriedo

    Natasha Dartigue received her law degree from Howard University School of Law in 1995 and worked on the Howard Law Journal. Upon law school graduation, Ms. Dartigue clerked in the Baltimore City Circuit Court for the late Judge Roger W. Brown.

    Following her clerkship, she joined the Office of the Public Defender (“OPD”) in Baltimore City, where she served in many capacities during her 26-year tenure. She began her career as trial attorney in the juvenile, district and circuit court divisions. Over time, she was elevated to serve as a felony trial supervisor, Deputy District Public Defender for Baltimore City, and Acting District Public Defender.

    In May 2022, Ms. Dartigue made history when she was appointed to serve as the Maryland State Public Defender, becoming the first person of color to lead the office. Ms. Dartigue, who is the daughter of Haitian immigrants, has highlighted the importance of her historic appointment, noting that it “redefines what leadership looks like and expands the possibilities for Black and brown children.” She adds that it “especially provides hope to children of immigrants, who are often overlooked and undervalued, that opportunities do exist.” Ms. Dartigue began serving her six-year term on July 1, 2022.

    At work and in the community, much of Ms. Dartigue’s energy is devoted to providing individuals with the tools to be successful. She is a community advocate, active member leader of various professional organizations including the Maryland State Bar Association (MSBA), Bar Association for Baltimore City, Monumental City Bar Association, Alliance of Black Women Attorneys, the Maryland Criminal Defense Attorneys Association, the Women’s Bar Association, and Innovation Works. Additionally, she is a social equity strategist who creates workshops to promote shared understanding and greater awareness of diversity, equity and inclusion issues. She provides implicit bias trainings and leadership development instruction at local, state, and national conferences.

    For her significant accomplishments, outstanding leadership and dedicated public service, Ms. Dartigue has received various awards and acknowledgements from the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, National Association of Public Defenders and the Baltimore City Department of Recreation & Parks. Ms. Dartigue was also recognized as Government lawyer of the Year by the Bar Association of Baltimore City.

    In 2018, the Maryland Daily Record bestowed Ms. Dartigue the Leadership in Law Award. She was also named one of the Daily Record’s 2018 Top 100 Women. In 2022, Ms. Dartigue was again recognized for her significant contributions in the field of law by The Daily Record, and selected as a 2022 Influential Marylander honoree. She continues to be a trailblazer and the Baltimore Sun acknowledged her as one of “25 Black Marylanders to Watch in 2023.

    Mr. Carriedo is an Assistant Federal Public Defender for the Federal Public Defender for the District of Maryland.

    PAULI MURRAY

     

    A Trailblazer in the Law, Activist Against Racial and Sex Discrimination, and the First Black Woman Ordained an Episcopal Priest

    Profile Summary by Sonia Kumar

    Pauli Murray was a Maryland-born Black scholar, lawyer, activist and writer whose work shaped landmark civil rights cases and movements, yet whose profound contributions to the advancement of civil rights remain largely unacknowledged.  Murray was an architect of some of the most significant civil rights arguments in recent American history, including key arguments in Brown v. Board used by Thurgood Marshall to overturn Plessy v. Ferguson and the application of the Fourteenth Amendment to women in Reed v Reed, used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a young lawyer in briefs on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union before the U.S. Supreme Court, among many others. 

    Born in Baltimore in 1910 and later raised in Durham, North Carolina by extended family, Pauli Murray was a Black person whose writings reflected feeling misgendered as a woman.* The deep pride in Blackness instilled by Murray’s family and the intersection of Murray’s identities converged and shaped Murray’s life’s choices and vision for human rights. 

    As a young person, Murray refused to acquiesce to the “separate but equal” doctrine and actively avoided participating in it whenever possible; for example, choosing to ride bicycles instead of segregated public buses.  Murray sought admission to better-resourced white schools rather than attend a segregated colleges and graduate schools, but was unable to gain legal assistance to do so.  Murray’s letter-writing campaign to gain admission to graduate programs at the all-white University of North Carolina did not result in admission, but did lead to a lifelong correspondence with Eleanor Roosevelt.  

    Murray challenged anti-Black racism through civil disobedience and media campaigns well before the height of the mainstream civil rights movement.  In 1940, 15 years before the Montgomery bus boycotts, Pauli Murray and a friend refused to move to a Blacks-only section of a segregated bus in Virginia; because they were charged under a disorderly conduct statute instead of state segregation laws, the case fizzled out.  The following year, Murray enrolled in Howard Law school; Murray was the only woman in the entire class.  While in law school, Murray joined the Congress of Racial Equality, organized sit-ins at D.C. lunch counters, and worked vigorously to establish equal rights for Black Americans. 

    Later, a professor at Howard would share with Thurgood Marshall a paper Murray wrote as a student on how to attack Plessy v. Ferguson; several of Murray’s arguments were used in the seminal case Brown v. Board of Education.  Murray’s prolific writings included several books, including a book documenting race-based laws in every state that the ACLU distributed widely, and Thurgood Marshall referred to as a “bible” of the civil rights movement.  

    Murray graduated at the top of the 1944 Howard Law class; although tradition was that the valedictorian at Howard was granted admission to Harvard Law, Harvard refused to admit women and thus Murray was denied.  Based on these and other experiences, Murray coined the term “Jane Crow” to describe the compounding harms of race and sex discrimination against Black women.  

    Murray also is regarded among the first to argue that the Fourteenth Amendment could be used to challenge discrimination on the basis of sex; indeed, Murray’s contributions to this theory were so significant that Ruth Bader Ginsberg, then a law professor writing for the ACLU, credited Murray as an honorary co-author in briefs before the U.S. Supreme Court in Reed v. Reed, the landmark case establishing that the Fourteenth Amendment prohibited sex discrimination.  Murray served on the board of directors for the national ACLU and was also one of the founders of the National Organization for Women, but became frustrated with the organization’s lack of engagement with Black women.

    Murray achieved so many “firsts” that it is impossible to capture them all, and they only scratch the surface of Murray’s contributions to the law and the advancement of justice, but among them: in 1965, Murray was the first Black person to obtain Doctorate of Law from Yale Law School, and in 1977, Murray was the first Black woman ordained as an Episcopal priest.  The Church later designated Murray a saint. 

    Murray’s legacy is so much more than the scholarship that influenced key legal arguments shaping the civil rights movement.  Murray’s life and work provide a powerful reminder that in nearly every instance, the first people to make the “winning” argument are those who are most directly affected by an injustice, but sometimes they are just too far ahead of their time.  In the documentary film My Name is Pauli Murray, Justice Ginsburg observes: “We were not inventing something new.  We were saying the same things Pauli had said years earlier at a time when society was not prepared to listen.”

    * Some scholars of Murray’s life believe Murray would identify as trans or non-binary today.  Out of respect for Murray’s experiences, this article avoids designating pronouns for Murray, but refers to Murray as a woman when relevant to the discrimination Murray experienced.

    ***

    For further learning: Pauli Murray’s autobiography, Song in a Weary Throat: Memoir of an American Pilgrimage; Rosalind Rosenberg, Jane Crow: The Life of Pauli Murray; documentary My Name is Pauli Murray.

    Ms. Kumar is the Senior Staff Attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland.

    SHIRLEY BRANNOCK JONES

     

     

     

    Maryland’s First Female Federal District Court Judge; First Female Judge Elected to the Old Supreme Bench of Baltimore City, and First Female Assistant Attorney General 

    Photo Credit: Weyman Swagger/Baltimore Sun 1982

    Profile Summary by Maria Salacuse

    Shirley Brannock Jones was not only Maryland's first female Federal District Court Judge, she was also the first female Federal District Court Judge in the entire Fourth Circuit as well as the first female assistant attorney general and the first female judge on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City. 

    Born to a civilian Coast Guard worker and sailmaker and a homemaker in Cambridge, Maryland, Jones graduated in 1942 from Cambridge High School.  After receiving her associate degree in 1944 from what is now Baltimore City Community College, she received a law degree from the University of Baltimore in 1946. Admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1947, she worked for the state Department of Employment Security until she was appointed assistant city solicitor. She later became a Maryland’s first female assistant attorney general from 1958 to 1959, a judge of the Orphans’ Court, and the first female judge on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City beginning in 1961. 

    On May 22, 1978, Present Jimmy Carter nominated Jones to become a Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Maryland.  After being confirmed by the United States Commission, she received her commission on October 5, 1978, becoming the first female United States District Court Judge in Maryland as well as the entire Fourth Circuit. Jones continued as a United States District Court Judge until her resignation on December 31, 1982.  Jones died on May 16, 2019, at the age of 93.

    In discussing her career during an interview with The Baltimore Sun in 1982, Judge Jones reflected, “I had it tough, but not as tough as those women lawyers before me. Women couldn’t even belong to the city bar association until 1957. That was an obstacle in your profession.”  As Judge Joseph F. Murphy Jr., former judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals and the Circuit Court of Baltimore County, and a longtime friend of Jones noted in her 2019 obituary in The Baltimore Sun, "She was an excellent judge and made it easier for the female lawyers who joined her and followed her through the door. ... She opened the door wider for all of them.”

    ** For more information on Judge Jones, see Frederick N. Rasmussen, "Judge Shirley B. Jones, The First Female Federal Judge in Maryland History, Dies," BALT. SUN, May 29, 2019 and Charles V. Flowers, Making a Case for Women, BALT. SUN, Dec. 5, 1982.

    Maria Salacuse is an Assistant General Counsel with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  Any views presented in this profile are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of her employer.

     

    ROSE ZETZER

    First Woman Admitted to the Maryland State Bar Association

    Photo Credit: BALT. SUN., April 9, 1998

    It was not until 1946 that Maryland admitted women into its state bar association, making Maryland the last state to admit women to a state bar association. Prior to that time, women lawyers formed their own groups such as the Women’s Lawyers Association (the precursor to the Women’s Bar Association). Rose Zetzer was undaunted by the exclusion, applying for membership to the Maryland State Bar Association (MSBA) twenty consecutive times until she was finally admitted in 1946. 

    Born in 1904 in Baltimore City to Russian immigrants, Zetzer attended city schools and according to a 1970 interview in the Evening Sun, decided to become a lawyer when she was in the eighth grade during a discussion about whether women should have the right to vote. Zetzer graduated from Eastern High School, attended the Johns Hopkins and then received her law degree from the University of Maryland School of Law in 1925. Zetzer’s efforts to apply to a law firm were unsuccessful, largely because the law firms preferred to hire her as a stenographer. She instead opened her own law practice in Baltimore City and in 1940 formed Maryland’s first all women law firm: Zetzer, Carton, Friedler & Parke. She and other women also formed the Women’s Bar Association in 1927. From 1926 to 1946, Zetzer applied for membership to the MSBA, submitting a check for membership. But each year, the MSBA returned her check. When the MSBA finally granted Zetzer admission, Maryland was the last state to admit women to a state bar association. (It would be another 10 years until women were granted membership into the Bar Association for Baltimore City.).

    In addition to pushing for women to be admitted to the MSBA, she also lobbied for women to be jury members. The Maryland General Assembly passed a partial (exempting 12 counties) women’s jury service bill in 1947.

    Metzer died on April 5, 1998, at the age of ninety-four.

    *** For more information on Metzer, see Deborah Sweet Eyler, The Early Female Jewish Members of the Maryland Bar: 1920–1929, 74 Md. L. Rev. 545 (2015)Lynne A. Battaglia & Evelyn Lombardo Cusson, "From Exclusion to Acceptance: Women Lawyers in Maryland," Maryland State Bar Association, available at www.msba.org; and Fred Rasmussen, “Rose Zetzer, 94, Founded 1st All-Female Law Firm in Md.”, BALT. SUN., April 9, 1998.  For information on women on Maryland juries, see Dennis M. Sweeney, "June 1 Marks Anniversary of Having Women on Maryland Juries," Maryland Daily Record, May 31, 2010

    Maria Salacuse is an Assistant General Counsel with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  Any views presented in this profile are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of her employer.

    ETTA HAYNIE MADDOX

     

    First Woman Licensed to Practice Law in Maryland & Suffragist

    Photo Credit: The Baltimore City Historical Society Inc. 

    Profile Summary by Maria Salacuse

    Etta Haynie Maddox was the first woman licensed to practice law in Maryland. Born in 1860 in Baltimore, Maryland, she attended Eastern Female High School and later studied voice at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. While traveling as a vocalist, she became involved in the suffrage movement. In 1900, the Baltimore Law School accepted her into its first class of students where she was the only female in the class. Although she graduated in 1901, she could not take the bar or practice law because the Act of 1898 limited the practice of law to men. See e.g. Section 3 of Chapter 139 of the Act ("All applications for admission to the bar shall be referred by the Court of Appeals to the State Board of Law Examiners, who shall examine the applicant, touching his qualifications for admission to the bar.")(empahsis added). Maddox petitioned the Court of Appeals to permit her to take the bar exam, but the Court denied her request, finding that that the right to practice law was not a natural inherent right. In re Etta H. Maddox, 50 A. 487 (Md. 1901). After Maddox lobbied the state legislature, State Senator Jacob M. Moses introduced Senate Bill No. 30 to amend law to admit women to the bar. On April 8, 1902, Governor John Walter Smith signed it into law.  

    Maddox took and passed the bar examination with distinction in June 1902. On September 11, 1902, the Court of Appeals formally admitted her to the bar making her the first licensed woman lawyer in the State of Maryland. On March 4, 1911, the United States District Court for the District of Maryland admitted Maddox to practice before it.  In addition to practicing law, Maddox was actively involved in women’s suffrage, co-founding the Maryland Suffrage Association and writing the Maryland’s suffrage bill in 1910.  After the United States Constitution was amended to give women the right to vote, Maddox remained active in pressing for social changes including equal pay for equal work.  She died in Baltimore on February 19, 1933, and is buried in Greenmount Cemetery in Baltimore.

    *** For additional information on Maddox, please see the Maryland State Archives' biography and related underlying historical sources, including interesting Baltimore Sun articles.  

    Maria Salacuse is an Assistant General Counsel with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  Any views presented in this profile are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of her employer.


  • published Future of Affirmative Action Panel 2023 in Gallery 2023-06-15 11:31:51 -0400

    Future of Affirmative Action Panel 2023

                                    

        

      

         


  • published 2021-2022 News in News 2023-06-15 08:38:20 -0400

    Prior Chapter News 2022-2023

    Another Fireside Chat: Magistrate Judge Matthew J. Maddox 

    On May 26, 2022, the Maryland Chapter hosted a virtual fireside chat with Magistrate Matthew J. Maddox.  Attendees learned about his background and practice preferences.

    Magistrate Judge Brendan A. Hurson Participates in Fireside Chat

    On April 19, 2022, the Maryland Chapter hosted a virtual fireside chat with Magistrate Judge Brendan A. Hurson.  FBA Board Member Tyra Robinson had the privilege asking him questions about his experience, practice preferences and music preferences. 

     

    Chief Judge James K. Bredar Delivers Virtual State of the Court Address 

    On March 29, 2022, the Maryland Chapter hosted the Virtual State of the Court Address with Chief Judge James K. Bredar.  Chapter President Nicholé C. Gatewood provided introductory remarks and Board Member Adam Abelson hosted the event. 

     

    Maryland Chapter Honored at FBA's 2021 Annual Convention in Miami.

    On September 25, 2021, the Maryland Chapter was selected for two awards by the Federal Bar Association: the Chapter Activity Presidential Achievement Award and the Meritorious Newsletter Award. The Presidential Achievement Award recognized those outstanding chapters that demonstrated diligent work, accomplishments, and programming over the past year.  The Meritorious Newsletter recognized the best newsletters published by chapters, sections, and divisions to stimulate and encourage continued use of those valuable tools for connection. Katherine Newberger was at the helm as Chapter President during the relevant time period. 

    Bob Brennen, President-Elect and editor of our Newsletter, and Lauren McLarney, Chair of our Younger’s Lawyer Division, accepted the awards on the Chapter’s behalf during the Awards Luncheon at the FBA’s 2021 Hybrid Annual Convention & Meeting in Miami, Florida. 

    Right to Left: Bob Brennen, President-Elect and FBAMD's Newsletter Editor and Lauren McLarney, FBAMD's Younger Lawyer's Division Chair. 


  • published Conversation with Williams in Photo Gallery 2023-03-10 17:40:25 -0500

  • Introduction to Federal Practice Program and Admission Ceremony 2023

    President of the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association Robert Brennan, Louis Malick, Bradley Strickland and Hon. Theodore Chuang discuss Pleading, Jurisdiction, Venue and Removal.

     

    Hon. Paula Xinis and Kristen Eriksson discuss motions practice. 

    AUSA Brandon Moore, AFPD Rosana Chavez and Hon. Timothy Sullivan discuss Initial Appearances and Detention Hearings.

    Tom Barnard and Hon. Gina L. Simms discuss discovery and ESI.

    Hon. Richard D. Bennett and Hon. Benson Legg (Ret.) discuss evidence.

    Hon. Ajmel Quereshi and M. Celeste Bruce (not pictured) discuss mediation.

     

    Deena Hausner, Associate Director of The Marjorie Cook Foundation Domestic Violence Clinic discusses prob bono opportunities to assist victims of domestic violence.

    Swearing in Ceremony by Hon. Lydia K. Griggsby.


  • published Presidential Achievement Award in Awards 2022-10-03 11:20:50 -0400

    Presidential Achievement Award

    The Maryland Chapter Wins Its Third Presidential Achievement Award

    The Maryland Chapter was the recipient of a Federal Bar Association Presidential Achievement Award during the FBA’s 2023 Annual Meeting & Convention in recognition of its superior chapter activities in the areas of Administration, Membership Outreach and Programming.  Robert S. Brennan served as Chapter President and led the charge during the 2022-23 term.  A hearty congratulations to the Chapter and its leadership on its third consecutive year of receiving a Presidential Achievement Award.                

               

     

     


  • published 2022-2023 News in News 2022-08-22 12:22:49 -0400

    Prior Chapter News

    FBA Maryland Chapter Hears Engaging Panel on the Future of Affirmative Action

    On Tuesday, June 6th the FBA Maryland Chapter hosted a panel discussion on the future of affirmative action at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Chief Legal Officer for Baltimore City Public Schools Joshua Civin led the discussion with esteemed panelists University of Maryland Francis Carey School of Law Dean Renee McDonald Hutchins, Patrick Strawbridge, and David Hinojosa. The discussion focused on the policy and legal issues presented in Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College and Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. University of North Carolina, and the future of affirmative action policies in the United States.  Strawbridge, a partner at Consovoy McCarthy, represented Students for Fair Admissions which sued the University of North Carolina for considering an applicant's race in the admissions process, claiming that it is a violation of the Equal Protection Clause.  Hinojosa, the Director of the Education Opportunities Project at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law leads a team which represents multiracial groups of students and alumni defending affirmative action plans in three separate cases filed against Harvard College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Texas at Austin. Strawbridge and Hinojosa, both of whom argued the UNC case before the Supreme Court, explained their clients' respective positions.  Opining on whether affirmative action was still necessary, Dean Hutchins stated "We know enough is enough when we reach some semblance of equality. We are so far from that now." The Chapter thanks the panelists for such an engaging discussion. For more pictures from the event, click here.

             

    FBA Maryland Chapter Annual Luncheon Brings Together the Bench and the Bar

    On Friday, May 19, 2023 the Maryland Chapter welcomed members of the Bar and Bench of the District of Maryland to the chapter’s Annual Luncheon at the Baltimore Hyatt Hotel. During the pre-luncheon reception, members warmly greeted one another as they mingled and introduced one another to their networks. The atrium was abuzz with celebratory excitement for the afternoon’s programming celebrating the honorees.

    Judge Paul W. Grimm, who recently retired from the Bench to accept appointments from the Dean of the Duke University School of Law as the Director of the Bolch Judicial Institute and by the school’s faculty as the David F. Levi Professor of Law, served magnificently as Master of Ceremonies. With his hallmark humility and wit, Judge Grimm helped the Chapter honor U.S. District Judge George Hazel and Bankruptcy Judges Thomas J. Catliota and Duncan W. Keir on their retirements from the Bench, and U.S. District Judge Julie R. Rubin and U.S. Magistrate Judge Ajmel A. Quereshi on their appointments and those honorees (with the exception of Judge Catliota who was unable to attend) responded with their own gracious remarks. Judge Grimm also gave a nod to Judges Catherine A. Blake, Richard D. Bennett and Ellen Hollander on their taking senior status and former Clerk of the Court, Felicia Cannon on her retirement after many years of outstanding service. Chapter President Bob Brennen honored Judge Grimm on his many accomplishments, retirement from the bench and appointments at Duke, and also presented Kramon & Graham’s Jim Ulwick with the Chapter’s DiRito award for his service to the District and exemplary career. The Chapter would like thank Judge Grimm and the other honorees for their participation, as well as the Luncheon Committee of Adam Abelson, Francisco Carriedo, Nichole C. Gatewood, Patricia McLane, Dawn Resh, Gina M. Smith, Maria Salacuse, Bob Brennen and especially Committee Chair Mark Saudek. For more photos of the event, click here.

    Our Fireside Chats Continue: U.S. District Court Judge Theodore D. Chuang 

    The FBA Maryland Chapter continued its fireside chat series by welcoming U.S. District Judge Theodore D. Chuang on April 13, 2023.  Judge Chuang joined the bench in 2014.  Public service is part of his fabric.  His parents immigrated to the United States seeking political freedom, and they strove to give back.  This played a significant role in Judge Chuang serving in all three branches of federal government—roles in the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security, as investigative counsel in the House of Representatives, and as a law clerk and now judge.  The judge also gave great practice tips, such as honing written arguments, seeking reconsideration of adverse decisions, and preparing for oral argument.  If you’re tinkering with font size and margins, you’ve written too much.  If a judge offers Monday or Friday as a deadline, choose Friday and enjoy your weekend.  Having grown up in Massachusetts, Judge Chuang is a longtime Boston sports fan (though he noted that the Yankees are mutual rivals of the Orioles).  And he shared how his clerkship experience informed how he approaches being a judge.  That experience also informs how he selects and builds relationships with his own law clerks.  We thank Judge Chuang for the great chat. 

     A Fireside Chat with U.S. District Court Judge Stephanie A. Gallagher 

    On March 23, 2023, the Maryland Chapter hosted a virtual fireside chat with U.S. District Court Judge Stephanie A. Gallagher.  The chat covered a variety of topics.  After graduating from law school, Judge Gallagher clerked, worked at a large law firm, became a federal prosecutor, and opened her own small firm.  She did not always set out to become a lawyer.  But it ended up being the perfect fit.  Plus, her path gave her a solid of mix of criminal and civil experience that she now brings to the bench.  Judge Gallagher discussed her practice preferences.  Written submissions are very critically important for dispositive motions.  For discovery disputes, she encourages litigants to meet in person or speak with each other.  And she stressed ways to streamline proceedings, like flagging objections in advance, outside the presence of the jury, or streamlining the number of filings when briefing dispositive motions.  We also learned more about Judge Gallagher the person: her close relationship with her law clerks, the judges she tries to emulate, and her favorite Orioles players.  We thank Judge Gallagher for her time and the wonderful chat. 

    A Conversation with a Trailblazer: Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. (Ret.) 

    On February 28, 2023, FBA Maryland Chapter hosted A Conversation with a Trailblazer with United States District Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. (Ret.). As part of our chapter's celebration of Black History Month, Nichole' C. Gatewood, the Immediate Past President of the Maryland Chapter of the Federal Bar Association and Chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, spoke with Judge Williams about his career journey. Judge Williams has held a multitude of positions including private practitioner, state’s attorney, federal judge, and founder and director of a social justice policy institute.

    Throughout his career, Judge Williams has never backed down from an obstacle or been accepting of a roadblock. From being told that he was not college material, to breaking down barriers to become the first Black person elected State's Attorney for Prince George's County, MD, and the impact of this historic win simultaneously making him the first Black person to hold countywide office, he has never accepted the label of being non-qualified. Instead of allowing small-minded perspectives to deter the accomplishment of his goals, he used the naysaying to propel him forward. Taking the audience along his journey, Judge Williams imparted valuable life lessons, career advice, and civic wisdom.

    Emphasizing the importance of mentorship and sponsorship, Judge Williams explained the vital role that having a network of supporters plays in breaking through barriers. He told the audience about his tough road to judicial confirmation and the pivotal role that having and nurturing relationships played in his confirmation to the federal court. For nearly 20 years, he proudly served on the Maryland federal court with distinction before retiring. After sharing some of his most memorable cases, Judge Williams stressed the value of building a strong reputation and laying a sound body of work as a foundation for judicial consideration. A nurturer of relationships, Judge Williams noted some of the highly respected jurists and elected officials that he has mentored and supported over the years.

    Growing up in a strong and loving family, Judge Williams was equipped to thrive and not just survive. After retiring from the bench in continuation of his life’s mission of giving back, he took on the role of change agent and founded The Judge Alex Williams Jr. Center for Education, Justice, and Ethics. In this capacity, he has come full circle and uses his life and career experiences to champion policy development and effectuates change. And as if that were not enough, he is still teaching at his alma mater Howard University, in the law school and School of Divinity. Judge Williams personifies the definition of a trailblazer, and we share more about his path and purpose in his upcoming book, “Non-Qualified.”

    A Conversation With A Trailblazer - Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. (Ret.) - YouTube

    Introduction to Federal Practice Program Brings New Lawyers Together with Judges  

    The Maryland Chapter held its annual “Introduction to the Federal Practice” program on February 24, 2023 at the federal courthouse in Greenbelt. About 80 lawyers registered for the program held in the Court’s ceremonial courtroom. After remarks by Judge Theodore D. Chuang and Chapter President Bob Brennen, and a primer on the courthouse from Chief Deputy Clerk David E. Ciambruschini, attendees received pointers on pleading, evidence, civil discovery and motions practice and criminal practice from several distinguished members of the bench and bar. In addition, Deena Hausner, Managing Attorney for the House of Ruth’s Marjorie Cook Foundation Domestic Violence Legal Clinic, made a presentation regarding the various opportunities through which members of the federal bar can provide pro bono assistance to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. The program concluded with the Hon. Lydia K. Griggsby presiding over a swearing in ceremony for those attendees who were not already members of the Court’s bar, followed by a reception.

     

    Fireside Chat Held with Peter M. Nothstein, Resident Legal Advisor with the U.S. Embassy in Doha, Qatar

    On January 18, 2023, in the latest installment of our “Fireside Chat” series Chapter President Bob Brennen sat down with fellow Chapter Board member Peter Nothstein to talk about Peter’s experiences as the Resident Legal Advisor assigned to the United States Embassy in Doha, Qatar. Peter is a Maryland native and graduate of the University of Maryland School of Law. In addition to clerking for the Hon. Marvin J. Garbis (ret.) and four years in private practice with firms in Baltimore and Washington D.C. Peter has worked several years as a prosecutor with the United States Attorney’s Office in Baltimore.  Since 2017 he has been prosecuting cases with the Public Integrity Section of the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington D.C. In December 2021 Peter accepted an assignment through the Criminal Division’s Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training (“OPDAT) to the U.S. Department to serve as the Resident Legal Advisor at the U.S. Embassy in Doha, Qatar, where he currently resides with his wife and two-year-old son. As Resident Legal Advisor Peter’s role is to work with representatives of Qatar’s law enforcement and justice sector institutions to enable those institutions and their personnel to more effectively combat terrorism, organized crime, corruption, financial crimes and other types of crime, and simultaneously enable them to more effectively cooperate regionally and with the United States in combating such crime.

    Peter described how he came to accept the assignment in Qatar, Qatar’s legal system and how it differs from ours in the U.S., and some of the challenges he has faced in establishing relationships with Qatar’s law enforcement community. He also described life in Doha (including the weather--it’s hot!), the diverse population of ex-pats and migrants living and working there, and the build up to, experience of, and aftermath of the recent World Cup championship held there. It was a fascinating discussion. We thank Peter for logging in and sharing his evening with our afternoon (with the 8-hour time difference) and for his service to our country, congratulate him on upcoming arrival of his second child, and look forward to welcoming him back to the States when his assignment concludes.

    Another Successful Fireside Chat Held on December 16th: United States Judge Lydia Kay Griggsby

    The FBA Maryland Chapter’s Fireside Chat series welcomed United States District Judge Lydia Kay Griggsby on Friday, December 16, 2022.  Judge Griggsby joined the bench after a career in all three branches of federal government, including several years as a judge on the United States Court of Federal Claims, as counsel for different Senate committees, and in multiple roles for the Department of Justice.  These extraordinary experiences have contributed to how Judge Griggsby views the law today. Judge Griggsby’s grandmother and mother were strong influences throughout her life.  She passes on that influence by mentoring young women in Baltimore (particularly those interested in the arts), and she encourages young people everywhere to consider careers in the law.  For others interested in eventually joining the bench, Judge Griggsby recommended that newer lawyers try different experiences and embrace new challenges.  This helped Judge Griggsby her own understanding of the law. In addition, Judge Griggsby shared her practice preferences, including her standing order for motions in civil cases, and her expectations for litigators in criminal cases.  Above all, Judge Griggsby values civility among the litigants, and she takes great pains to make sure everyone is heard. Finally, Judge Griggsby shared her love of gardening, including the great success that she’s had growing pepper plants.  During the pandemic, she learned to play chess. We welcome Judge Griggsby to the bench and thank her for the wonderful chat.

    Fireside Chat Held with United States Judge Julie Rubin on October 24th

    On Monday, October 24, 2022, the FBA Maryland Chapter’s Fireside Chat series featured United States District Judge Julie Rubin.  Judge Rubin joined the federal bench after having previously served as an associate judge on the Baltimore City Circuit Court.  Before that, she was a trial lawyer in private practice in Baltimore. Judge Rubin never let her accomplishments go to her head.  She emphasized the importance of never taking herself too seriously.  Lawyers could be brilliant and hardworking, while also being down to earth and personable.  Those are traits she noticeably displayed throughout her chat.  Judge Rubin also discussed the value of mentorship.  She shared the insight other judges gave her when she first took the bench.  Some lawyers may argue forcefully and passionately, but she is guided by the law and facts.  She found it equally important to help the next generation of lawyers.  Maryland Chapter member Jamar Brown, who led the discussion, provided a good example.  Jamar had his first jury trial before Judge Rubin in the Baltimore City Circuit Court.  Jamar sought Judge Rubin’s feedback after that trial, and she has been a close mentor ever since.  Along those same lines, Judge Rubin shared with the audience her practice preferences and tips. Finally, Judge Rubin gave a window into her life outside the law.  She is an avid runner.  Running, she admitted, was both a passion and necessity—because her other passion is food.  It was a pleasure to hear from Judge Rubin, and she is a welcomed addition to the bench.

    Fireside Chat Held with United States Magistrate Judge Quereshi on September 21st

    In the latest installment of the Maryland Chapter’s Fireside Chat series, we had the great pleasure of speaking recently with United States Magistrate Judge Ajmel Quereshi.  Judge Quereshi spoke about his background as a public interest lawyer, providing insight into his time as a Skadden Fellow with the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, Director of the Howard University School of Law Civil Rights Clinic, a Wasserstein Fellow at Harvard Law School, and a Rappaport Fellow with Boston College Law School.  These experiences, Judge Quereshi observed, provided a foundation for his career in public service, as well as an opportunity to advocate for underserved communities.  Judge Quereshi followed these experiences by working as staff counsel at the ACLU’s National Prison Project, where he advocated for a population he described as often outside our public sphere of service.  Judge Quereshi then served the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, where he served as Senior Counsel, until joining the Court.  Judge Quereshi described how these opportunities allowed him to broaden his advocacy skills, while engaging with clients on issues of both individual and systemic justice.

    Judge Quereshi spoke with candor, humility, and frankness.  He described how his parents and childhood community instilled in him a strong work ethic and how he has carried that forward.  In every community in which Judge Quereshi has lived and worked, he described how he has tried to dedicate himself to being a voice for positive change.  Mentors have been extremely significant in Judge Quereshi’s career, from judges with whom he worked to colleagues and senior lawyers.  As Judge Quereshi’s career has developed, he in turn has sought to provide guidance and mentoring to other lawyers.  He described how he views our legal system as a critical tool for achieving our ideal of a just and fair society.   While Judge Quereshi modestly deferred any discussion of his intended legacy, the qualities he brings to the bench provide the background, temperament, and skills needed for a career that will enrich our Court and serve litigants with impartiality, wisdom, and justice. 

    We welcome Judge Quereshi to the bench and look forward to his years of service to come.


  • donated 2023-05-15 14:16:23 -0400


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